Writing For College

A general degree in the liberal arts or humanities studies covers a wide range of subjects and will bolster research and writing skills, while also giving you some more specific subject matter expertise to work with.

Again, this is an easy program to find in many geographic areas.

One is this business writing major within the Interdisciplinary Studies program at Baruch College, a part of the CUNY education system.

This writing major would be ideal for those looking to practice the craft within a corporate environment.

An undergrad degree in linguistics will really push a student writer into the minutiae of our language.This is a writing major that is readily available nationwide, including the BA at Columbia or one at Emory.​ This major seems to be the default when more specialized programs aren't available.A major in English forces you to write, and then rewrite.Earning a BA in creative writing will give you the two things you need most as a writer: practice and feedback.Although creative writing may be the domain of aspiring authors, freelance writers can also make a living by writing creatively.Here are the 20 writing majors for college students seeking a writing degree, along with a few program examples.There are very general writing degrees available; that is, one can major in just "writing." For example, Grand Valley State University in Michigan offers a writing major which results in either a Bachelor of Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree, depending on your chosen concentration.Finally, a major in English will also teach you to read critically and research thoroughly.The solid skills that accompany a journalism degree are a great selling point.Technical writing involves providing simplified text about complicated or specialized topics for users who need it.Your classes may focus on understanding your end user (audience).

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  1. “ on collaborative memory is that the memory of groups is compared with that of individuals. group performance should not be compared with individual performance but rather with ‘nominal groups’ comprised of pooled, non-redundant data from the same number of people tested individually.” 8. Most research involving the Experimentally Induced Information methodology seeks to identify the influence of misinformation presented by one witness to another, and therefore the assumption is made that discussion between witnesses is a detrimental process. “While the misinformation effect is a well-established phenomenon, ‘what remains in dispute is the nature of a satisfactory theoretical explanation’ (ref.). Therefore, in order to understand why memory conformity occurs, we must draw from both cognitive research on memory and social research on conformity.