Thesis Statement For Science Projects

To avoid misunderstandings, be as specific as possible.

Compare the original thesis (not specific and clear enough) with the revised version (much more specific and clear): The thesis statement should do more than merely announce the topic; it must reveal what position you will take in relation to that topic, how you plan to analyze/evaluate the subject or the issue.

Normally you will continue to refine your thesis as you revise your argument(s), so your thesis will evolve and gain definition as you obtain a better sense of where your argument is taking you.

Do not assume, for example, that you have the same understanding of what “society” means as your reader.

Hypothesis: Chocolate may cause pimples All of these are examples of hypotheses because they use the tentative word "may." However, their form in not particularly useful.

Using the word does not suggest how you would go about proving it.

(will be worked on in class prior to due date) Your hypothesis statement will be turned in during science class, reviewed by the teacher and returned.

Below is a short explanation of a hypothesis statement and some examples of hypothesis statements.

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One thought on “Thesis Statement For Science Projects”

  1. First, you want to make sure the topic you choose allows you to make a claim that can be supported by evidence that’s considered credible and appropriate for the subject matter...and, unfortunately, your personal opinions or that Buzzfeed quiz you took last week don’t quite make the cut.

  2. Many of the questions and activities, which help students understand what a satire is, and how Twain uses this form to ridicule and rebuke the slaveholding society of Huck Finn, will probably be familiar.