The Crucible Act 3 Essay Questions Homework Help Physics

Introduction Carefully Explore Miller's Success in Creating A Dramatic Climax at the End of Act III in "The Crucible" In the play "The Crucible" Arthur Miller creates a successful dramatic climax at the end of Act III.Integral to this success is Miller's continued engagement with the audience.Once Abigail is under pressure and she is at risk of being undermined she is able to control the situation by creating an 'imaginary' scene.Abigail lets out a loud chilling cry, which would have tremendous impact on the audience and stunned both the other characters and perhaps the audience also into silence.Danforth, as “the Deputy Governor of the Province” of Massachusetts is an extremely powerful and influential man, a representative of the King of England.He represents the combined authority of church and state in this theocratic society of the day.The events that lead to the witch- hunt were, in my view, the bubble bursting- such repression found an outlet!Arthur Miller states “the witch- hunt was not mere repression” but a “long overdue opportunity for everyone to express publicly his guilt and sins under the accusations against victims.

What news does Danforth give John Proctor about his wife? Why did the court not believe this assertion at first? He describes the people of Salem as a “sect of fanatics whose creed forbade anything resembling a theatre or vain enjoyment” and a “holiday from work meant that they must concentrate even more upon prayer.” Their outlook and self enforced discipline did help them to survive a life, which I can only imagine as very harsh, as some of the first settlers in America.These people lived by very strict rules and regulations, and were not allowed to express their feelings physically or verbally. What happens to the people who signed the deposition upholding the three women? What does Giles Corey charge in his deposition against Thomas Putnam? What does Hale suggest after the deposition is read? Why does Danforth not allow Proctor to obtain a lawyer? Proctor is told that his wife claims she is pregnant. The court first assumed that Elizabeth was lying about pregnancy to avoid hanging. Proctor tells Danforth that Elizabeth is incapable of telling a lie. Danforth offers to Elizabeth one year to bear her child, hoping that this will allow him to drop his charges against the court. All 91 signers are ordered arrested for questioning. Corey charges Putnam with attempting to kill his neighbors in order to buy their land. Putnam claims the accusation is a lie, and since the charge cannot be proved, Putnam is believed. Mary’s deposition claims she never dealt with Satan and that her friends are lying. Hale advises Proctor to return to the court with a lawyer to present such serious evidence. Danforth claims that the evidence against those accused is invisible and that a lawyer would only call extraneous witnesses.Finally, to conclude, Miller's creation of a dramatically successful climax is based upon the importance of involvement with the audience and Miller's implementation of social and historical context in 'The Crucible".Explain what happens in Act 3 from Danforth’s point of view- and show how Arthur Miller makes it clear to the audience that Danforth is not only misguided but deliberately ignores any evidence that casts doubt on the stories of Abigail Williams GCSE English Literature 20th Century Drama Coursework, “The Crucible” by Arthur Miller Essay Question: Explain what happens in Act 3 from Danforth’s point of view- and show how Arthur Miller makes it clear to the audience that Danforth is not only misguided but deliberately ignores any evidence that casts doubt on the stories of Abigail Williams and the other girls.We do not meet Danforth until the start of Act 3, although Arthur Miller mentions him briefly at the beginning of Act 2 not by name but by his office.Danforth is not one of the main characters in the play but he is certainly the most controversial.Abigail and the rest of the girls pretend that Mary Warren has shape shifted into a "yellow bird" which would have bewildered an audience. Conclusion To appeal intellectually to the audience of the play Miler, in particular the contemporary audience, Miller's underlying message is to illustrate the absurdity of Mc Carthyism by comparing it to the Salem witch-hunt.The engagement of the audience is crucial to the dramatic success of the whole play; this is because the drama occurring on stage at the climax of the play would be completely irrelevant if the audience were not motivated during the Act.

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