Statistics About Homework

Parents wanting more homework out-numbered those who wanted less. Several popular anti-homework books fill store shelves (whether virtual or brick and mortar).depicts homework as one aspect of an overwrought, pressure-cooker school system that constantly pushes students to perform and destroys their love of learning., published an impassioned article, “A National Crime at the Feet of Parents,” accusing homework of destroying American youth.

(e.g., A third grader would have 30 minutes of homework, while a seventh grader would have 70 minutes).The crusade would remain powerful through 1913, before a world war and other concerns bumped it from the spotlight.Nevertheless, anti-homework sentiment would remain a touchstone of progressive education throughout the twentieth century.However, only 59 percent of Asian students’ parents check that homework is done, while 75.6 percent of Hispanic students’ parents and 83.1 percent of black students’ parents check.Teachers with less experience assign more homework.Examining the most reliable empirical evidence at the time, the study concluded that the dramatic claims about homework were unfounded.An overwhelming majority of students, at least two-thirds, depending on age, had an hour or less of homework each night.essay, Karl Taro Greenfeld laments his 13-year-old daughter's heavy homework load.As an eighth grader at a New York middle school, Greenfeld’s daughter averaged about three hours of homework per night and adopted mantras like “memorization, not rationalization” to help her get it all done.As a political force, it would lie dormant for years before bubbling up to mobilize proponents of free play and “the whole child.” Advocates would, if educators did not comply, seek to impose homework restrictions through policy making.Our own century dawned during a surge of anti-homework sentiment.

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