Poverty And In Africa Essay

If solutions work African nations could potentially move up to a newly industrialized country or to developed country status. Poverty in Africa is the lack of provision to satisfy the basic human needs of certain people in Africa.I believe that the United Nations most likely will not reach these goals by 2015, because it is only three years away and African nations are nowhere near where the goals expect to be.In the last twelve years very little progress has been made towards these goals, therefore it is very unlikely that those goals will be met within the next three years.I believe a major issue that is keeping African nations from breaking out of poverty is the cultural differences on the continent.Governments and foreign donors should appreciate and recognize diversity and make sure any policies aimed at fighting poverty should be agreed by all tribes on the continent.

In South Africa, most of the land is often in the hands of descendants of European settlers of the late 19th century and early 20th century. Middle It is not the lack of education that keeps Africans from planting crops but the treatment of them by the landowners.

This situation of a low standard of living is clearly reflected in the Human Development Index where African nations are typically near the bottom, despite the continents wealth of natural resources.

Inch CGW4U January 9th, 2012 Poverty in Africa Poverty in Africa is a world issue because many countries on the continent are living in poverty and there is little money for the basic necessities of life.

Agricultural practices that tax the soil lead to soil erosion, which lowers crop yields and pollutes rivers and streams with silt.

The accumulation of the silt from the loose eroded soil kills the fish in rivers and streams.

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  1. Sometimes conflicts arise between the social worker's professional obligation to a client – the client's right to confidentiality, for example – and the social worker's own ethics, her concern for the client's well-being or her obligation to the community.