Law Dissertation Introduction

Supervisors are also likely to be incredibly busy with teaching commitments and so you need to establish when and how to approach them. Many students make the mistake of simply writing about what the law was or what the law is without necessarily considering the wider social, political or economic consequences of the legislation or case law.

Consider, for instance, section 172 of the Companies Act 2006 which requires directors to act in the best interests of a company’s shareholders.

My advice would be to generally steer clear of these.

Universities recognise this and will provide students with detailed structural and formatting guidelines, as well as some high-level guidance with regards to being original and analytical.

This goes without saying, but one of the major problems that students come up against is the evolutionary nature of the law.

You will begin researching months before the submission date and there are likely to be some changes in that time.

Such a rule doesn’t affect just shareholders; it also has wide-ranging consequences for the rest of society in terms of the payment of corporation tax, wealth and health inequality, the growth in atypical workers and access to justice.

In order to establish these links, it was necessary for me to draw upon financial textbooks, reports from charities and studies conducted by economists – not just legal resources.

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