John Dewey Critical Thinking

The eldest sibling died in infancy, but the three surviving brothers attended the public school and the University of Vermont in Burlington with John. With this nascent ambition in mind, he sent a philosophical essay to W. Harris, then editor of the and the most prominent of the St. Harris's acceptance of the essay gave Dewey the confirmation he needed of his promise as a philosopher.

While at the University of Vermont, Dewey was exposed to evolutionary theory through the teaching of G. With this encouragement he traveled to Baltimore to enroll as a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University.

It was during his years at Chicago that Dewey's early idealism gave way to an empirically based theory of knowledge that was in concert with the then developing American school of thought known as pragmatism.

This change in view finally coalesced into a series of four essays entitled collectively "Thought and its Subject-Matter," which was published along with a number of other essays by Dewey's colleagues and students at Chicago under the title (1903).

This experience provided the material for his first major work on education, (1899).

A primary focus of Dewey's philosophical pursuits during the 1930s was the preparation of a final formulation of his logical theory, published as (1949), the last coauthored with Arthur F. Dewey continued to work vigorously throughout his retirement until his death on June 2, 1952, at the age of ninety-two.

The central focus of Dewey's philosophical interests throughout his career was what has been traditionally called "epistemology," or the "theory of knowledge." It is indicative, however, of Dewey's critical stance toward past efforts in this area that he expressly rejected the term "epistemology," preferring the "theory of inquiry" or "experimental logic" as more representative of his own approach.

At Johns Hopkins Dewey came under the tutelage of two powerful and engaging intellects who were to have a lasting influence on him.

George Sylvester Morris, a German-trained Hegelian philosopher, exposed Dewey to the organic model of nature characteristic of German idealism. Stanley Hall, one of the most prominent American experimental psychologists at the time, provided Dewey with an appreciation of the power of scientific methodology as applied to the human sciences.

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