How To Structure A Dissertation

This is where you emphasise that your research aims/ objectives have been achieved. '" shape="poly" coords="195,147,249,147,248,73,195,72,194,106,172,104,175,129,195,128" href="/node/254" alt="Conclusion" /Write this last.You also emphasise the most significant results, note the limitations and make suggestions for further research. It is an overview of your whole thesis, and is between 200-300 words.You can write any suggestions on further research in this field.For example, tell what is especially important to focus on and how some general issues may be narrowed down by other experts.Often part of the Introduction, but can be a separate section.It is an evaluation of previous research on your topic, where you show that there is a gap in the knowledge that your research will attempt to fill. See literature reviews for more information and examples to get you started on your literature review. Outlines which method you chose and why (your methodology); what, when, where, how and why you did what you did to get your results. Outlines what you found out in relation to your research questions or hypotheses, presented in figures and in written text. Often you will include a brief comment on the significance of key results, with the expectation that more generalised comments about results will be made in the Discussion section.The Discussion CAN also include Conclusions/Future Research.Check with your supervisor.';" shape="poly" coords="189,73,249,75,248,1,193,0,185,23,169,20,169,47,186,43" href="/node/251" alt="Read and research" /Conclusions: Very important!

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The Discussion CAN also include Conclusions/Future Research. See our theses in discussion page for more information or try these exercises. This is where you emphasise that your research aims/objectives have been achieved. For more information see conclusions in honours theses or sample conclusions.Explain what tools you used to make any measurements.If you used a completely new approach, don’t forget to describe it in details so that your readers can understand the whole process.Perhaps you’ve obtained unexpected results and so you think that other people can better understand them in the future.Or maybe you’ve been expecting certain results that you didn’t manage to obtain.It is an evaluation of previous research on your topic, where you show that there is a gap in the knowledge that your research will attempt to fill.The key word here is evaluation.';" shape="rect" coords="93,3,167,72" href="/node/246" /Results: Outlines what you found out in relation to your research questions or hypotheses, presented in figures and in written text. Often you will include a brief comment on the significance of key results, with the expectation that more generalised comments about results will be made in the Discussion section.The structure of your paper depends on your field and prompts that you’ve been given.On the other hand, there are certain common standards that apply to all dissertations. First of all, it provides your readers with the basic information on your topic.Don’t use approximate numbers if your study requires accurate data.Your conclusions must illustrate the importance of your findings as well as your deep understanding of the results.

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