From An Essay Of Dramatic Poesy Summary

"Natural" rhymed verse is, however, just as appropriate to dramatic as to non-dramatic poetry: the test of the "naturalness" of rhyme is how well-chosen the rhymes are.Is the sense of the verses tied down to, and limited by, the rhymes, or are the rhymes in service to, and an enhancement of, the sense of the verses?Neander speaks in favour of the Moderns and respects the Ancients; he is however critical of the rigid rules of dramas and favours rhyme.

From An Essay Of Dramatic Poesy Summary-31From An Essay Of Dramatic Poesy Summary-37

John Dryden is one of the greatest poets of the seventeenth century.

An Essay on Dramatic Poesy is written in the form of a dialogue among four gentlemen: Eugenius, Crites, Lisideius and Neander. Eugenius favours modern English dramatists by attacking the classical playwrights, who did not themselves always observe the unity of place.

But Crites defends the ancients and points out that they invited the principles of dramatic art paved by Aristotle and Horace.

He relies heavily on Corneille - and through him on Horace - which places him in a pragmatic tradition.

Dryden wrote this essay as a dramatic dialogue with four characters Eugenius, Crites, Lisideius and Neander representing four critical positions.

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