Fresh Juice Business Plan

(Their products later would have simple names such as “Greens 1,” “Greens 2” and “Orange Turmeric Apple Lemon.”)In April to May 2010, the three took the first step towards what would later become Pressed Juicery, pooling ,000 each to launch the business. Pressed Juicery’s first physical location was a 22 square-foot broom closet -- yes, a broom closet -- beneath a yoga studio in a central Brentwood shopping center.

They bought a juice press, and Slater convinced a local cupcake shop to lend him their kitchen at night so he had a place to make juice. The team convinced the landlord to rent it out for

(Their products later would have simple names such as “Greens 1,” “Greens 2” and “Orange Turmeric Apple Lemon.”)In April to May 2010, the three took the first step towards what would later become Pressed Juicery, pooling $30,000 each to launch the business. Pressed Juicery’s first physical location was a 22 square-foot broom closet -- yes, a broom closet -- beneath a yoga studio in a central Brentwood shopping center.They bought a juice press, and Slater convinced a local cupcake shop to lend him their kitchen at night so he had a place to make juice. The team convinced the landlord to rent it out for $1,050 a month, and with a few tweaks -- installing a Dutch door and a single refrigerator -- it was ready to go.“It was mind-blowing how quickly I had forgotten how eating clean made you feel,” he says.“Eating crappy became my norm again.”He started off as an assistant to executive producer Cynthia Mort on the show Tell Me You Love Me, then started helping out in the writers’ room. Slater was filled with fear because, even if he hadn’t admitted it to himself yet, the industry seemed unattractive to him for the first time.Besides juice, it serves smoothies, flavored waters and frozen fruit soft-serve.The cold-pressed juice market was worth an estimated $4.3 billion in 2017. But despite Pressed Juicery’s success in that market, CEO Hayden Slater experienced his share of setbacks -- including a career 180, a health department shutdown and two run-ins with the FDA. Like any ‘80s kid born in Los Angeles, a young Slater grew up with fair weather alongside the film and TV industry and watching TGIF shows such as Full House.Since he was new to juice fasting, Slater’s original plan had been a five-day cleanse, but on the final day, stunned by his levels of energy and clarity, he decided to keep going.The cleanse meant drinking juice made from fruits and vegetables every few hours, and by day 14, he was counting the hours until the 30 days were up. He remembers looking in the mirror and being surprised to see how bright the whites of his eyes appeared.

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(Their products later would have simple names such as “Greens 1,” “Greens 2” and “Orange Turmeric Apple Lemon.”)In April to May 2010, the three took the first step towards what would later become Pressed Juicery, pooling $30,000 each to launch the business. Pressed Juicery’s first physical location was a 22 square-foot broom closet -- yes, a broom closet -- beneath a yoga studio in a central Brentwood shopping center.

They bought a juice press, and Slater convinced a local cupcake shop to lend him their kitchen at night so he had a place to make juice. The team convinced the landlord to rent it out for $1,050 a month, and with a few tweaks -- installing a Dutch door and a single refrigerator -- it was ready to go.

“It was mind-blowing how quickly I had forgotten how eating clean made you feel,” he says.

“Eating crappy became my norm again.”He started off as an assistant to executive producer Cynthia Mort on the show Tell Me You Love Me, then started helping out in the writers’ room. Slater was filled with fear because, even if he hadn’t admitted it to himself yet, the industry seemed unattractive to him for the first time.

,050 a month, and with a few tweaks -- installing a Dutch door and a single refrigerator -- it was ready to go.

“It was mind-blowing how quickly I had forgotten how eating clean made you feel,” he says.

“Eating crappy became my norm again.”He started off as an assistant to executive producer Cynthia Mort on the show Tell Me You Love Me, then started helping out in the writers’ room. Slater was filled with fear because, even if he hadn’t admitted it to himself yet, the industry seemed unattractive to him for the first time.

Slater planned to spend a few months traveling through Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, India and Japan, but he couldn’t have known embarking on the trip -- and his subsequent juice cleanse -- would change his life. A light bulb went off in Slater’s mind, sparking his idea to take his newfound passion for health and pursue it professionally. Build some sort of all-encompassing health business? Various people in his life figured if they let him pursue a juice business, he’d soon realize it was a bust and come back to the “right” path. He remembers his boss saying, in typical repartee, “I’ll see you in a couple months when it doesn’t work out.”Within less than a year, Slater pitched his juice idea to two childhood friends and brought them on board.Slater wanted to try a different approach.“Health and wellness can be a bit elitist,” he says, citing his experience growing up in L. He wanted to base his business on acceptance: the idea that there are no blanket “musts,” that everyone is at a different point in their journey and that -- “as corny as it sounds,” he says -- it’s important to listen to your body and pursue your own path.Slater, de Castro and Gores had a vision of a juice company that took intimidation and elitism out of wellness and allowed the ingredients to tell the story.At day 30, a part of him wanted to continue the journey.Slater would go on to co-found Pressed Juicery, a cold-pressed juice company that pegs its projected revenue at more than million for fiscal year 2019.Slater’s initial reluctance to take the class faded quickly and was replaced with inspiration.He would never forget his teacher’s most loyal sidekick: an ever-present thermos of green juice.Slater says the early days of the fledgling business were a constant rollercoaster, but the shop’s customer base was growing so quickly that there was little time to dwell on doubts.Without any sort of map or business plan, the team used their “ignorance,” as Slater calls it, to their favor, creating exactly what they as consumers would want and going about the process with a sort of magical blindness.Slater began incorporating cold-pressed juice into his morning routines.He calls it the “catalyst” -- the first real-life experience that opened his eyes to feeling healthier.

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