For And Against Homework Poverty In Belize Essay

Educators and policy makers must ask themselves—does assigning homework pay off?

The Scholastic article references Alfie Kohn’s book The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing, in which he says, “There is no evidence to demonstrate that homework benefits students below high school age.” The article goes on to note that those who oppose homework focus on the drawbacks of significant time spent on homework, identifying one major negative as homework’s intrusion into family time.

However, some parents, students and even some teachers feel that after 7-8 hours of lessons in school, it is unfair to expect students to come home and work for another three hours.

The first reason that children should not be given homework is that they need time to relax and take their minds off work.

Not only will this help the students get a better understanding of their work with any parts they are stuck on, it will also allow parents to get more involved in their child's educational life.

Thirdly, doing homework will prepare students for the big end tests.

If a child does poorly on an assignment then they will learn what is necessary to do well on the next test without being punished.

It also provides students with the opportunity to practice at what it takes to be successful in school. Doing homework is also a great way to develop responsibilities.

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We partner with third party advertisers, who may use tracking technologies to collect information about your activity on sites and applications across devices, both on our sites and across the Internet.As researcher Adam Maltese noted, “Our results hint that maybe homework is not being used as well as it could be.” The report further suggested that while not all homework is bad, the type and quality of assignments and their differentiation to specific learners appears to be an important point of future research.The Curry School of Education report did find a positive association between standardized test performance and time spent on homework, but standardized test performance shouldn’t be the end goal of assignments—a heightened understanding and capability with the content material should.They also point out that opponents believe schools have decided homework is necessary and thus assign it simply to assign some kind of homework, not because doing the work meets specifically-identified student needs.Students and parents appear to carry similar critiques of homework, specifically regarding assignments identified as busy work—long sheets of repetitive math problems, word searches, or reading logs seemingly designed to make children dislike books.When asked how homework can negatively affect children, Nancy Kalish, author of , says that many homework assignments are “simply busy work” that makes learning “a chore rather than a positive, constructive experience.” Commenters on the piece, both parents and students, tended to agree.One student shared that on occasion they spent more time on homework than at school, while another commenter pointed out that, “We don’t give slow-working children a longer school day, but we consistently give them a longer homework day.” The efficacy of the homework identified by Kalish has been studied by policy researchers as well.It’s not uncommon to hear students, parents, and even some teachers always complaining about homework.Why, then, is homework an inescapable part of the student experience?They can discuss their assignments or any problems that they are having with parts of their textbooks, before or after classes.The second benefit is that it can bring families closer together as students may ask their parents or siblings for help on their homework.

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