Essays On The Raven By Edgar Allan Poe

Similar to the studies suggested in Poe's short story "Ligeia", this lore may be about the occult or black magic.This is also emphasized in the author's choice to set the poem in December, a month which is traditionally associated with the forces of darkness.Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer Swung by seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor. When he goes to investigate, a raven flutters into his chamber."Wretch," I cried, "thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee Respite—respite and nepenthe, from thy memories of Lenore; Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore! Paying no attention to the man, the raven perches on a bust of Pallas above the door."'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door— Only this and nothing more." Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December; And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore— For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore— Nameless here for evermore.Amused by the raven's comically serious disposition, the man asks that the bird tell him its name. The narrator is surprised that the raven can talk, though at this point it has said nothing further.The narrator remarks to himself that his "friend" the raven will soon fly out of his life, just as "other friends have flown before" Even so, the narrator pulls his chair directly in front of the raven, determined to learn more about it.

"Surely," said I, "surely that is something at my window lattice; Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore— Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;— 'Tis the wind and nothing more!

"The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe.

First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere.

Finally, he asks the raven whether he will be reunited with Lenore in Heaven.

When the raven responds with its typical "Nevermore", he is enraged, and, calling it a liar, commands the bird to return to the "Plutonian shore" The narrator assumes that the word "Nevermore" is the raven's "only stock and store", and, yet, he continues to ask it questions, knowing what the answer will be. Maligec suggests the poem is a type of elegiac paraclausithyron, an ancient Greek and Roman poetic form consisting of the lament of an excluded, locked-out lover at the sealed door of his beloved.

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