Essay Questions About A Streetcar Named Desire

Since the focal theme of “A Streetcar Named Desire” is that of integration and adaptation, the relationship between Blanche and Stella is important and its function evident: Williams establishes a contrast between them. In Tennessee Williams’ play, A Streetcar Named Desire, the nature of theatricality, “magic,” and “realism,” all stem from the tragic character, Blanche Du Bois.

Blanche is both a theatricalizing and self-theatricalizing woman. The protagonist of A Streetcar Named Desire, Blanche Dubois, is a fallen southern Belle whose troubled life results in the deterioration of her mental health.

"A Streetcar Named Desire" is a story of damaged people.

Blanche Du Bois, a repressed and sexually warped Southern belle, seeks either atonement or reassurance; she wants someone to help lift the burden of her guilt for her twisted sexuality....

This action—the Mexican woman with “flores para los muertos” and the struggle of the drunk and the prostitute—provides not only local color but also a commentary on the main action.

When Blanche first arrives at the apartment, a screeching cat is heard, a minor bit of stage business that helps create a sense of Blanche’s tension. The “Blue Piano” and the “Varsouviana” fade in and out according to what is going on in the minds of the characters, particularly Blanche.

She has just returned from a date with Mitch and their conversation turns to her past....

is at its surface, an undoubtedly heterosexual play.

– a tragedy, after all – it is traditionally required that there should be a selected antagonist, a ‘villain’ so to speak.

Stanley Kowalski, you could argue, is that ‘villain’.

It is necessary to understand the freedoms a director has, and understand that an adaptation allows...

Power is the underlying current that runs through both Webster’s ‘The Duchess of Malfi’, a 17th century revenge tragedy, and Williams’ ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’, a 20th Century modern domestic tragedy. Through a focus upon gender, both Elia Kazan’s film of Tennessee Williams’ original play, A Streetcar Named Desire (Warner Bros, 1951) and Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid's Tale (Vintage, 1986) effectively manage to mirror the concerns of...

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