Essay On Criticism With Line Numbers

Art from that fund each just supply provides, Works without show, and without pomp presides: In some fair body thus th' informing soul With spirits feeds, with vigour fills the whole, Each motion guides, and ev'ry nerve sustains; Itself unseen, but in th' effects, remains.Some, to whom Heav'n in wit has been profuse, Want as much more, to turn it to its use; For wit and judgment often are at strife, Though meant each other's aid, like man and wife.If Mævius scribble in Apollo's spite, There are, who judge still worse than he can write.

Some few in that, but numbers err in this, Ten censure wrong for one who writes amiss; A fool might once himself alone expose, Now one in verse makes many more in prose.It also represents many of the chief literary ideals of Pope's age.Alexander Pope, a translator, poet, wit, amateur landscape gardener, and satirist, was born in London in 1688.Yet if we look more closely we shall find Most have the seeds of judgment in their mind; Nature affords at least a glimm'ring light; The lines, tho' touch'd but faintly, are drawn right.But as the slightest sketch, if justly trac'd, Is by ill colouring but the more disgrac'd, So by false learning is good sense defac'd; Some are bewilder'd in the maze of schools, And some made coxcombs Nature meant but fools.Though he remained in ill health throughout his life, he was able to support himself as a translator and writer. Arbuthnot” and the mock epic “The Rape of the Lock.” To read his work is to be exposed to the order and wit of the 18th century poetry that preceded the Romantic poets.As a Catholic at that time in Britain, he was ineligible for patronage, public office, or a position at a university. Pope primarily used the heroic couplet, and his lines are immensely quotable; from “An Essay on Criticism” come famous phrases such as “To err is human; to forgive, divine,” “A little learning is a dang’rous thing,” and “For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.” After 1718 Pope lived on his five-acre property at Twickenham by the Thames.It is a verse essay written in the Horatian mode and is primarily concerned with how writers and critics behave in the new literary commerce of Pope's contemporary age.The poem covers a range of good criticism and advice.A reading of the poem makes it clear that he is addressing not so much the ingenuous reader as the intending writer.It is written in a type of rhyming verse called heroic couplets.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

One thought on “Essay On Criticism With Line Numbers”