Argumental Thesis

Three-story men idealize, imagine, predict—their best illumination comes from above the skylight.The biggest benefit of the three-story metaphor is that it describes a process for building a thesis.With that specified, you can frame up the third story by articulating why the point you make matters beyond its particular topic or case.

The five-paragraph theme, outlined in Figure 3.1 is probably what you’re used to: the introductory paragraph starts broad and gradually narrows to a thesis, which readers expect to find at the very end of that paragraph. In the classic five-paragraph theme (Figure 3.1) it hardly matters which of the three reasons you explain first or second. ” The conclusion of an organically structured paper has a real job to do.

However, some students are surprised—and dismayed—when some of their early college papers are criticized for not having a good thesis.

Their professor might even claim that the paper doesn’t have a thesis when, in the author’s view it clearly does. Linen served as a form of currency in the ancient Mediterranean world, connecting rival empires through circuits of trade.

The economic role of linen raises important questions about how shifting environmental conditions can influence economic relationships and, by extension, political conflicts.

Putting your claims in their broader context makes them more interesting to your reader and more impressive to your professors who, after all, assign topics that they think have enduring significance. Many instructors and writers find useful a metaphor based on this passage by Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr.: There are one-story intellects, two-story intellects, and three-story intellects with skylights.

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