Anthony Bourdain Essay Essay On Nietzsche And Religion

If you think you have celiac disease, shouldn't you see a fucking doctor before you annoy the fuck out of people at a party? Bourdain: I haven't, and I'm dubious of it, of course. If you tell me it cooks a hamburger better than a grill, I'm willing to believe it. I know of a chef who I like very much, but he was doing edible menus. It would not be my preferred mouthful, let's put it that way. Bourdain: No, I don't think anyone would be so foolish as to invite me. I think my tastes, at this point, are pretty well-known. There are people out there, and they are legion, but nobody's eating at their restaurants. Bourdain: Well, I would like it to look like Singapore. Alcoholism is probably the number one problem in the restaurant industry. If you bring me a really good one, a good craft beer, I will enjoy it, and say so. I was in San Francisco, and I was desperate for beer, and I walked into this place. And I sat down, and I looked up, and I noticed there was a wide selection of beers I'd never heard of. Mingles perfectly with a runny yolk and soaks it up. So it was very exciting and not something you did a lot. But I did grow up in a time where the TV dinner was seen as freedom. That Swanson meatloaf with the fucking brownie -- that meant you didn't have to sit at the table. That was liberating -- at least we thought of it at the time as this liberating modern, you know, wonder food.

This sort of herd mentality around juice-cleansing. And, you know, papier-mâché is edible too, technically. I spent some time with Nathan Myhrvold, who worked with me on my book. And this is a guy who is pushing that sort of experimental, scientific exploration of what can be done with food about as far as you can go. It was -- much like Ferran Adrià -- it was food first, not "look at me, I'm a genius." For all of the unpleasant imitations of what they did at el Bulli, I think it is worth reminding people that, at all times, el Bulli was delicious first. The techniques were seemingly tortuous, but generally speaking, there were three or four ingredients. With hawker centers, with independently owned and operated businesses, who have been, for some time, doing the same one or two dishes very, very, very, very well. Because it's "organic." At least people are thinking about what they're putting in their mouths. Are we going to crack down on drugs and not alcohol? As a teenager, I mean, you know, I was indifferent to it. I don't have to sit here and answer questions about what we did?

I mean, I admire anyone who wants to cook and knowingly enters the field. You look behind the line, and you can just see the dream die. Just like in Chengdu." And somebody next to him says, "Well, I just got out of Per Se, and I didn't even have a reservation. Had 18 fabulous courses, and they comped me, you know, a La Tâche." Who's cooler? Twenty years ago, it would have been nothing but snowy-haired, well-to-do people, more or less. Sixty percent of the customers are Asian, or Asian-American. They're people who can't afford to eat at Le Bernardin regularly, but who saved their money, in much the same way that you save your money to see a band that you love, or to go to a ballgame and get good seats.

This terrible information sinking in, like, "Oh my God, this is nothing like they told me it was going to be." "This doesn't look like the glamorous stuff I've seen on TV."Bourdain: What is the god? And if that's not attractive to you, then you've really got a problem, or you're going to have a problem. Do you feel like mainstream adoption of it is going to happen? It is a viable form of entertainment, worth spending real bucks on. What is less defensible: to spend

If you think you have celiac disease, shouldn't you see a fucking doctor before you annoy the fuck out of people at a party? Bourdain: I haven't, and I'm dubious of it, of course. If you tell me it cooks a hamburger better than a grill, I'm willing to believe it. I know of a chef who I like very much, but he was doing edible menus. It would not be my preferred mouthful, let's put it that way. Bourdain: No, I don't think anyone would be so foolish as to invite me. I think my tastes, at this point, are pretty well-known. There are people out there, and they are legion, but nobody's eating at their restaurants. Bourdain: Well, I would like it to look like Singapore. Alcoholism is probably the number one problem in the restaurant industry. If you bring me a really good one, a good craft beer, I will enjoy it, and say so. I was in San Francisco, and I was desperate for beer, and I walked into this place. And I sat down, and I looked up, and I noticed there was a wide selection of beers I'd never heard of. Mingles perfectly with a runny yolk and soaks it up. So it was very exciting and not something you did a lot. But I did grow up in a time where the TV dinner was seen as freedom. That Swanson meatloaf with the fucking brownie -- that meant you didn't have to sit at the table. That was liberating -- at least we thought of it at the time as this liberating modern, you know, wonder food.This sort of herd mentality around juice-cleansing. And, you know, papier-mâché is edible too, technically. I spent some time with Nathan Myhrvold, who worked with me on my book. And this is a guy who is pushing that sort of experimental, scientific exploration of what can be done with food about as far as you can go. It was -- much like Ferran Adrià -- it was food first, not "look at me, I'm a genius." For all of the unpleasant imitations of what they did at el Bulli, I think it is worth reminding people that, at all times, el Bulli was delicious first. The techniques were seemingly tortuous, but generally speaking, there were three or four ingredients. With hawker centers, with independently owned and operated businesses, who have been, for some time, doing the same one or two dishes very, very, very, very well. Because it's "organic." At least people are thinking about what they're putting in their mouths. Are we going to crack down on drugs and not alcohol? As a teenager, I mean, you know, I was indifferent to it. I don't have to sit here and answer questions about what we did?I mean, I admire anyone who wants to cook and knowingly enters the field. You look behind the line, and you can just see the dream die. Just like in Chengdu." And somebody next to him says, "Well, I just got out of Per Se, and I didn't even have a reservation. Had 18 fabulous courses, and they comped me, you know, a La Tâche." Who's cooler? Twenty years ago, it would have been nothing but snowy-haired, well-to-do people, more or less. Sixty percent of the customers are Asian, or Asian-American. They're people who can't afford to eat at Le Bernardin regularly, but who saved their money, in much the same way that you save your money to see a band that you love, or to go to a ballgame and get good seats.This terrible information sinking in, like, "Oh my God, this is nothing like they told me it was going to be." "This doesn't look like the glamorous stuff I've seen on TV."Bourdain: What is the god? And if that's not attractive to you, then you've really got a problem, or you're going to have a problem. Do you feel like mainstream adoption of it is going to happen? It is a viable form of entertainment, worth spending real bucks on. What is less defensible: to spend $1,000 on Knicks seats, or $300 at Le Bernardin? They're seeing shows like yours and they're like, "Hey, destination food."Bourdain: Yeah. Even if you could only afford to do it rarely, the fact that you aspire to that, and are willing to spend money -- I think that speaks well of people.Nearly 60 minutes later, just as our allotted interview end time, shifted by his delayed arrival, is upon us, a torrential, biblical downpour begins outside, leading to the gifted time."I ain't leaving anytime soon in that shit, so take all the time you want," he says.

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If you think you have celiac disease, shouldn't you see a fucking doctor before you annoy the fuck out of people at a party? Bourdain: I haven't, and I'm dubious of it, of course. If you tell me it cooks a hamburger better than a grill, I'm willing to believe it. I know of a chef who I like very much, but he was doing edible menus. It would not be my preferred mouthful, let's put it that way. Bourdain: No, I don't think anyone would be so foolish as to invite me. I think my tastes, at this point, are pretty well-known. There are people out there, and they are legion, but nobody's eating at their restaurants. Bourdain: Well, I would like it to look like Singapore. Alcoholism is probably the number one problem in the restaurant industry. If you bring me a really good one, a good craft beer, I will enjoy it, and say so. I was in San Francisco, and I was desperate for beer, and I walked into this place. And I sat down, and I looked up, and I noticed there was a wide selection of beers I'd never heard of. Mingles perfectly with a runny yolk and soaks it up. So it was very exciting and not something you did a lot. But I did grow up in a time where the TV dinner was seen as freedom. That Swanson meatloaf with the fucking brownie -- that meant you didn't have to sit at the table. That was liberating -- at least we thought of it at the time as this liberating modern, you know, wonder food.

This sort of herd mentality around juice-cleansing. And, you know, papier-mâché is edible too, technically. I spent some time with Nathan Myhrvold, who worked with me on my book. And this is a guy who is pushing that sort of experimental, scientific exploration of what can be done with food about as far as you can go. It was -- much like Ferran Adrià -- it was food first, not "look at me, I'm a genius." For all of the unpleasant imitations of what they did at el Bulli, I think it is worth reminding people that, at all times, el Bulli was delicious first. The techniques were seemingly tortuous, but generally speaking, there were three or four ingredients. With hawker centers, with independently owned and operated businesses, who have been, for some time, doing the same one or two dishes very, very, very, very well. Because it's "organic." At least people are thinking about what they're putting in their mouths. Are we going to crack down on drugs and not alcohol? As a teenager, I mean, you know, I was indifferent to it. I don't have to sit here and answer questions about what we did?

I mean, I admire anyone who wants to cook and knowingly enters the field. You look behind the line, and you can just see the dream die. Just like in Chengdu." And somebody next to him says, "Well, I just got out of Per Se, and I didn't even have a reservation. Had 18 fabulous courses, and they comped me, you know, a La Tâche." Who's cooler? Twenty years ago, it would have been nothing but snowy-haired, well-to-do people, more or less. Sixty percent of the customers are Asian, or Asian-American. They're people who can't afford to eat at Le Bernardin regularly, but who saved their money, in much the same way that you save your money to see a band that you love, or to go to a ballgame and get good seats.

This terrible information sinking in, like, "Oh my God, this is nothing like they told me it was going to be." "This doesn't look like the glamorous stuff I've seen on TV."Bourdain: What is the god? And if that's not attractive to you, then you've really got a problem, or you're going to have a problem. Do you feel like mainstream adoption of it is going to happen? It is a viable form of entertainment, worth spending real bucks on. What is less defensible: to spend $1,000 on Knicks seats, or $300 at Le Bernardin? They're seeing shows like yours and they're like, "Hey, destination food."Bourdain: Yeah. Even if you could only afford to do it rarely, the fact that you aspire to that, and are willing to spend money -- I think that speaks well of people.

,000 on Knicks seats, or 0 at Le Bernardin? They're seeing shows like yours and they're like, "Hey, destination food."Bourdain: Yeah. Even if you could only afford to do it rarely, the fact that you aspire to that, and are willing to spend money -- I think that speaks well of people.

So that means all of the goofy pretenders who get into the business because they think they're gonna get a TV show. The Platonic ideal of tomato soup, for me and many others, is what mom made because she opened a can. I think that's what Ferran Adrià did very, very well. I didn't feel the need to undermine it, you know, like, "I will prove that I'm a different person now by performing in a tour of Some people are instinctively not going to like me, for very understandable reasons. I don't feel any obligation to play a part -- or play a part, for that matter. And I don't think that was good for him, or his work. I know how to disappoint people, hurt them, betray them, let people down, let myself down. A bar is to go to get a little bit buzzed, and pleasantly derange the senses, and have a good time, and interact with other people, or make bad decisions, or feel bad about your life. But, you know, just give me the name, tell me where it's from, and that's OK. But I think they somehow expect me to have better taste in beer than whatever generic green bottle I happen to be grabbing. Also, it's different, because the show is more about going and finding the food, not the beer, right? Bourdain: Yeah, personally, I think a lot of this is rooted in the fact that, for most of the low points of my professional career, I was a breakfast or a brunch cook.I mean, I think bogus trends, they don't last long.The restaurant business, in my experience, is sort of like an organic creature. Is it better than Krispy Kreme and a decent street slice? , those years, had already long gone -- I wasn't doing cocaine, I wasn't fucked up on heroin, I wasn't pounding tequila shots all night, or going out with waitresses -- I would bump into a lot of line cooks on the road who would want to do those things, and would expect me to take part. Bourdain: I think people's expectations of me, as far as what I'm eating, are already pretty low. Some of them suck, some of them are going to be good, some will be interesting -- that's interesting to me.I don't know if that even qualifies as food, but I've had numerous colonoscopies, as most gentlemen of my years have, and you can cleanse completely in about 24 hours. It was always specifically referred to as the place to which it belonged; neither Catalonia or his childhood roots in Andalucía. Selling those things quickly, at an affordable price. I don't understand why we don't have that kind of beloved street-food-type culture that Singapore or Kuala Lumpur or Hong Kong, for instance, have. What I find interesting is the proliferation of juice joints. I mean, a lot of people work in the restaurant business because they're alcoholic. I mean, who wants to hang with their parents at the dinner table, really? I mean, now that I'm a dad, of course, I don't want my daughter to eat in front of the TV. I don't have time to do more, but I would happily do more.That would be good for the world, and I think we deserve it. So my hope would be that we'd see a lot more of that. These people are selling little bottles of coconut water for like, two and a half bucks. Ideally, like any other large company, you should be able to go the boss and say, "Look, I have a problem," or the boss noticing you've got problems, says, "Look, we notice you have a problem. We will happily send you to rehab and hold your job for you, but you need help." But who does that? I want her to sit at the table with me in an organized meal and I'm like a Jewish mom. Eat, eat." I try to express love through food in a tyrannical, overbearing way. The true god of the restaurant business, of professional cooking, is not brilliance and creativity. It is doing the same thing, exactly the same, again and again and again. Bourdain: I am very, very much for all restaurant people making a living wage. And you know, two weeks' vacation was pretty much unthinkable -- there wouldn't be a job waiting for me when I came back. What do you think is the worst, dumbest, most pointless food trend right now?Because as it is now, most restaurant people cannot afford to eat in their own restaurants. I never had health insurance for almost all of my career. Bourdain: Look, generally speaking, I'm surprisingly accepting of these little trends and trendlets as part of a larger, positive process.But generally speaking -- I mean, the gluten-free thing is ripe for comedy. And we went through a period where every place you walk in -- look, it is a fair observation that, no matter what community you go to at this point, chances are there will be a chef with "I Love Bacon" tattooed on his chest, with a charcuterie program. There may be a lot of shit charcuterie out there, or maybe it's not there yet, but in a sense, we're becoming more like Italy. Because they're out there making -- I may not want them to call it "artisanal pizza," maybe it grates to hear that, but chances are, it's better pizza than I was eating 20 years ago. Bourdain: Yeah, that's just -- I think it's a matter of personal taste. As much as I like presidential candidates choking down corn dogs, and deep-fried butter, or whatever else, I don't think it's good for the world, you know? I know what it's like to look in the mirror and be disgusted and ashamed. But I looked around: the entire place was filled with people sitting there with five small glasses in front of them, filled with different beers, taking notes. There's nothing to differentiate it from a big box of Gallo Burgundy. Most of the home fries I have in diners are not good, they're not cooked all the way through, they're not crisp. I just don't think structurally they're an ideal potato. I'm hardly an advocate for healthy living, but it seems to me a big pile of buttered toast is good, bacon is good, sausage is good, eggs is good. It's just one of those things that's like, "Aw, dude." That gives me the sads, that doesn't uplift me or make me happy to be alive. Bourdain: You know, I am so old that it was considered an exotic treat to go to, like, Burger King or Mc Donald's.I tell a joke during my speaking gigs: Celiac disease is a very serious illness, you know? You go to Where do you hope that fast food will be 20 years from now, 25 years from now? I've never had ketchup better than, you know, the common variety. The restaurant industry still hasn't cracked down on, or at least still accepts, drug use in the kitchen, yet it's a serious problem. Bourdain: We're talking independently owned and operated restaurants with a thin, if any, profit margin. To start with, first of all, how do you monitor such a situation. I mean, where else are they going to work, for god's sake? It's possible to make a good home fry, I'm sure somebody does. I don't think they bring anything to the eggs -- and I like a nice, runny egg -- compared to a big hunk of butter wheat toast. OK, the food that everyone else seems to like that makes you go, "Eh."Bourdain: I don't much like scallops. That was not something that I had prior to age, I dunno, maybe 8 or 9. Bourdain: You know, so those are roots flavors, too.People who had no other option but the service industry.Now you have a lot of people who want to be in the service industry. If you look at the growth in the sommelier trade, the quality of servers in decent restaurants, I think, has gone up considerably, on balance. There are always delusional people who thought it would be a great idea, who decided to "follow their passion." This was always a lethal instinct. And I think the genuine problem is that there are a lot of cooking schools around the country who, in a predatory way, have contributed to or have essentially knowingly encouraged people who, in good conscience, should not be encouraged, and leading them to believe that, at 35 years old, they will be able to roll out of this third-tier cooking school, saddled with a huge and often punitive debt, and somehow ever get out from under. The people who go to a place like Gramercy Tavern know they're going to pay a lot of money to eat.

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